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Pikachu

Pikachu, the mascot of the series

Pokémon, known in Japan as Pocket Monsters (though the name "Pokémon" was also later introduced in Japan), is a series by Nintendo and Game Freak which started as a game series, but it's also popular by its derived anime series and trading card game, and it was adapted into some other media as well.

The series is centered around the titular creatures, little monsters that are caught and trained to battle by people called Pokémon Trainers. The first game features 151 Pokémon, and each later game introduced many new ones, so the current list counts 719 Pokémon.

Video Games

(When not specified the original Japanese title is the same as the western one, only with "Pocket Monsters" instead of "Pokémon" for the most part)

Main Games

The main, or "core" series consists in 7 games, each one coming in two versions, followed by one or two extra versions, for a total of 21 original main series releases (not counting the western Pokémon Red and Blue as different versions), plus three remakes coming in two versions each, for a total of 27 main series releases. Each core series game features all Pokémon released to that point, but only some are normally available in each one of them, since each version of a generation features some exclusive ones, only available through trading from other versions, some only obtainable through trading from a previous generation game, and a few only given away through special events such as Nintendo exhibitions or giveaways. Third versions usually feature slight changes and occasionally new modes and characters, but they feature the same Pokémon list as the main game they're based on, only with a different combination of version-exclusive Pokémon. Each main game and its updates is called "Generation", so Pokémon Red, Blue, Green and Yellow are the First Generation games and so on.
The core series games are:

Mewtwo

Mewtwo, one of the main legendary Pokémon

  • Pocket Monsters: Red and Pocket Monsters: Green (Feburary 27, 1996), Game Boy. The original Japanese release, it features 151 Pokémon. (Starters: Charmander, Bulbasaur, Squirtle; Legendary: Zapdos, Articuno, Moltres, Mewtwo) Re-released in 2015 for Nintendo 3DS.
    • Pocket Monsters: Blue (October 15, 1996), Game Boy. First regular update, featurng slightly improved graphics and sound. Re-released in 2016 for Nintendo 3DS.
      • Pokémon Red Version and Pokémon Blue Version (September 28, 1998), Game Boy. The first international release, it uses the game engine from Blue, but the two versions feature the same version-exclusive Pokémon from
        Red pokemon

        Red,the starring of first game.

        Red and Green respectively. These are usually considered just localizations of the previous three versions, and not actual new versions. Re-released in 2016 for Nintendo 3DS.
    • Pokémon Yellow Version: Special Pikachu Edition (September 12, 1998), Game Boy. Originally released in Japan as Pocket Monsters: Pikachu, this version features Pikachu as the only starter Pokémon, referencing the anime, and has some other changes. Re-released in 2016 for Nintendo 3DS.
  • Pokémon Gold Version and Pokémon Silver Version (November 21, 1999), Game Boy Color. Featuring 100 new Pokémon, bringing the total up to 251. There are some minor differences in the various localizations of the game. (Starters: Chikorita, Cyndaquil, Totodile; Legendary: Raikou, Entei, Suicune, Lugia, Ho-Oh) Re-released in 2017 for Nintendo 3DS.
    • Pokémon Crystal Version (December 14, 2000), Game Boy Color.
      Pokemon starter

      Charmender,Bulbasaur and Squirtle the first pokemon Starter.

  • Pokémon Ruby Version and Pokémon Sapphire Version (November 21, 2002), Game Boy Advance. Featuring 135 new Pokémon, bringing the total up to 386. (Starters: Treecko, Mudkip, Torchic; Legendary: Latias, Latios, Regice, Registeel, Regirock, Groundon, Kyogre, Rayquaza)
    • Pokémon Emerald Version (September 16, 2004), Game Boy Advance.
  • Pokémon Diamond Version and Pokémon Pearl Versions (September 28, 2006), Nintendo DS. Featuring 107 new Pokémon, bringing the total up to 493. (Starters: Turtwig, Chimchar, and Piplup; Legendary: Azelf, Mespirit, Uxie, Dialga, Palkia, Giratina, Cresselia, Darkrai, Manaphy, Phione, Heatran, Regigigas, Shaymin, and Arceus)
    • Pokémon Platinum Version (September 13, 2008), Nintendo DS.
  • Pokémon Black Version and Pokémon White Version (September 18, 2010), Nintendo DS. Featuring 156 new Pokémon, bringing the total up to 649. (Starters: Snivy, Tepig, Oshawott; Legendary: Victini, Cobalian, Terrakion, Virizion, Keldeo, Tornadus, Thundurus, Landorus, Zekrom, Reshiram, Kyurem, Meloetta, Genesect)
    • Pokémon Black Version 2 and Pokémon White Version 2 (June 23, 2012), Nintendo DS.
  • Pokémon X and Pokémon Y (October 12, 2013), Nintendo 3DS. Featuring 72 new Pokémon, bringing the total up to 721. (Starters: Chespin, Fennekin, Froakie; Legendary: Xerneas, Yveltal, Zygarde, Diancie, Hoopa, Volcanion)
  • Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon (November 18, 2016), Nintendo 3DS. Featuring 81 new Pokémon, bringing the total up to 802. (Starters: Rowlet, Litten, Popplio; Legendary: Tapu Koko, Tapu Lele, Tapu Bulu, Tapu Fini, Cosmog, Cosmoem, Solgaleo, Lunala, Necrozma, Magearna, Marshadow)
    • Pokémon Ultra Sun and Pokémon Ultra Moon (November 17, 2017), Nintendo 3DS.

Remakes

Three remakes were released, adding elements from then-current generation games, and making it possible to trade Pokémon with them. These are:

  • Pokémon FireRed Version and Pokémon LeafGreen Version (January 29, 2004), Game Boy Advance.
  • Pokémon HeartGold Version and Pokémon SoulSilver Version (September 12, 2009), Nintendo DS.
  • Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire (November 21, 2014), Nintendo 3DS.

Secondary games

Many other games were released that while not part of the core series, are relevant to the franchise, being released on Nintendo consoles, some times featuring connectivity with core games and in some cases even introducing new Pokémon before their actual debut in the core series. These are:

Stadium Games

These are games centered around singular trainer battles, therefore lacking most of the RPG gameplay:
  • Pocket Monsters' Stadium (August 1, 1998), Nintendo 64. Only released in Japan, it only features 42 playable Pokémon from the First Generation, though all 151 are viewable in other game modes.
    • Pokémon Stadium (April 30, 1999), Nintendo 64. Known in Japan as Pocket Monsters' Stadium 2, it's an updated version of the first stadium game, featuring all 151 Pokémon available for battle.
  • Pokémon Stadium 2 (December 14, 2000), Nintendo 64. Known in Japan as Pocket Monsters' Stadium Gold and Silver, it features all 251 Pokémon from Generation II.
  • Pokémon Colosseum (November 21, 2003), GameCube. Featuring more RPG elements and including the Pokémon from Generation III.
  • Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness (August 4, 2005), GameCube. A sort of sequel to Colosseum, it still features Pokémon from Generation III.
  • Pokémon Battle Revolution (December 14, 2006), Wii. Featuring Pokémon from Generation IV.


Puzzle games

  • Pokémon Puzzle Challenge (September 21, 2000), Game Boy Color. Known as Pokémon de Panepon in Japan, it's a Panel de Pon game featuring Pokémon characters. Re-released for 3DS Virtual Console in 2014.
  • Pokémon Puzzle League (September 25, 2000), Nintendo 64. Basically a home console version of Pokémon Puzzle Challenge featuring characters from the anime series, it was only released in North America and Europe. Re-released for Wii Virtual Console in 2008.
  • Pokémon Trozei! (October 20, 2005), Nintendo DS. Puzzle game known as Pokémon Link! in Europe.
  • Pokémon Battle Trozei (March 12, 2014), Nintendo 3DS. Known as Pokémon Link: Battle! in Europe.
  • Pokémon Shuffle (February 18, 2015), Nintendo 3DS. free-to-play puzzle game. Later also released for iOS and Android as Pukémon Shuffle Mobile, with only slight differences.
  • Pokémon Picross (December 2, 2015), Nintendo 3DS.


Pokémon mini

Pokémon is possibly the only franchise to receive its own dedicated game console, the Pokémon mini, released on December 14, 2001.
Only the four launch games were released worldwide. Games released for this console are:
  • Pokémon Party mini (December 14, 2001), a party game featuring 6 minigames.
  • Pokémon Zany Cards (December 14, 2001), a card game.
  • Pokémon Pinball mini (December 14, 2001), a pinball game.
  • Pokémon Puzzle Collection (December 14, 2001), a collection of 4 original puzzle games.
  • Pokémon Shock Tetris (March 21, 2002), a Pokémon-themed Tetris game. Only released in Japan and as Pokémon Tetris in Europe.
  • Pokémon Breeder mini (December 14, 2002), a pet simulation game. Only released in Japan.
  • Pokémon Puzzle Collection Vol. 2 (April 26, 2002), collection of 4 new puzzle games. Only released in Japan.
  • Pokémon Race mini (July 19, 2002), a platformer racing game. Only released in Japan.
  • Pichu Bros. mini (October 18, 2002), party game featuring 6 minigames and starring the Pichu Bros. from the anime. Only released in Japan.
  • Togepi's Great Adventure (October 18, 2002), puzzle-adventure game starring Togepi. Only released in Japan.


Pokémon Box

Utility softwares used to store Pokémon from the core games.
  • Pokémon Box Ruby & Sapphire (May 30, 2003), GameCube. Compatible with Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire through link cable.
  • My Pokémon Ranch (March 25, 2008), Wii. Compatible with Generation IV games.
  • Pokémon Bank (December 25, 2013), Nintendo 3DS. Available through Nintendo eShop and compatible with Generation VI games.
    • Poké Transporter (December 25, 2013), Nintendo 3DS. An extention to Pokémon Bank used to transfer Pokémon from Generation V.


Pokémon Mystery Dungeon

Pokémon games using the Mystery Dungeon format.
  • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team and Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team (November 17, 2005), released for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS respectively. They feature Pokémon from Generation III.
  • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Darkness (September 13, 2007), Nintendo DS. Featuring Pokémn from Generation IV.
    • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Sky (April 18, 2009), Nintendo DS. An update to Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness.
  • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Keep Going! Blazing Adventure Squad!, Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Let's Go! Stormy Adventure Squad!, and Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Go For It! Light Adventure Squad! (August 4, 2009), WiiWare. Only released in Japan.
  • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity (November 23, 2012), Nintendo 3DS.
  • Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon (September 17, 2015), Nintendo 3DS.


Pokémon Ranger

Series of action-adventure games for Nintendo DS:
  • Pokémon Ranger (March 23, 2006)
  • Pokémon Ranger: Shadows of Almia (March 20, 2008)
  • Pokémon Ranger: Guardian Signs (March 6, 2010)


Pokémon Rumble

Action-adventure games starring toy versions of Pokémon.
  • Pokémon Rumble (June 16, 2009), WiiWare.
  • Pokémon Rumble Blast (August 11, 2011), Nintendo 3DS.
  • Pokémon Rumble U (April 24, 2013), Wii U.
  • Pokémon Rumble World (April 8, 2015), Nintendo 3DS. Free-to-play downloadable game. A phisical copy was also later released.


Other games:

  • Pokémon Pikachu (March 27, 1998), a virtual pet toy and pedometer.
  • Hey You, Pikachu! (December 12, 1998), Nintendo 64. Known in Japan as Pikachu Genki Dechu, it's a pet simulation game, where the player gets to raise and train a Pikachu, also being able to talk to it through the N64's Voice Recognition Unit, which came boundled with the game. It features a total of 18 Pokémon from Generation I, plus one (Togepi) from Generation II.
  • Pokémon Card GB (December 18, 1998), Game Boy Color. Video game simulating the card game, it's known as Pokémon Trading Card Game outside Japan. Re-released for Nintendo 3DS Virtual Console in 2014.
  • Pokémon Snap (March 21, 1999), Nintendo 64. A first person rail shooter where the player has to take photos of Pokémon. Re-released for Wii Virtual Console in 2007.
  • Pokémon Pinball (April 14, 1999), Game Boy Color. A pinball game themed after the Pokémon series and including a special rumble feature.
  • Pokémon Pikachu 2 GS (November 21, 1999), a color version of Pokémon Pikachu. It also features infrared communication with Generation II games.
  • Pokémon Card GB2: Great Rocket-Dan Sanjo! (March 28, 2001), Game Boy Color. Only released in Japan.
  • Pokémon Channel (July 18, 2003), GameCube. A pet simulation game, considered a spiritual successor to Hey You, Pikachu! The game also includes an emulated Pokémon mini, complete with all games available at the time and a new one: Snorlax's Lunch Time.
  • Pokémon Pinball: Ruby & Sapphire (August 1, 2003), Game Boy Advance. New Pinball game based on Generation III games.
  • Pokémon Dash (December 2, 2004), Nintendo DS. A racing game.
  • PokéPark: Fishing Rally DS (May 10, 2005), Nintendo DS. A fishing game only released in limited edition only in Japan.
  • Pokéwalker (September 12, 2009), pedometer device released alongside Pokémon HeartGold Version and Pokémon SoulSilver Version, and featuring compatibility with the games.
  • PokéPark Wii: Pikachu's Adventure (December 5, 2009), Wii. An action-adventure game starring Pokémon from Generation IV games.
  • Pokémon Dream World (September 18, 2010), PC. Browser-based online game, featuring connectivity with Generation V games. Service closed on January 14, 2014.
  • Learn with Pokémon: Typing Adventure (April 21, 2011), Nintendo DS. A typing game.
  • Pokédex 3D (June 6, 2011), Nintendo 3DS. A utility software letting players view their Pokémon in 3D. It features 153 Pokémon from Generation V.
    • Pokédex 3D Pro (July 14, 2012), Nintendo 3DS. Updated version of Pokédex 3D featuring all Pokémon from Generation V.
  • Pokémon Card Game: How to Play DS (August 5, 2011), Nintendo DS. Game to teach players how to play the card game, it was only released in Japan.
  • PokéPark 2: Wonders Beyond (November 12, 2011), Wii. Second PokéPark game, it features Pokémon from Generation V.
  • Pokémon Conquest (March 19, 2012), Nintendo DS. A crossover with Nobunaga's Ambition.
  • Pokémon Dream Radar (June 23, 2012), Nintendo 3DS. Known as Pokemon AR Searcher, is a first person shooter using Augmented Reality view.
  • Pokédex for iOS (December 6, 2012), smartphone version of Pokédex 3D.
  • Pokémon Tretta Lab (August 10, 2013), Nintendo 3DS. Portable adaptation of the arcade game Pokémon Tretta, featuring a special accessory.
  • The Thieves and the 1000 Pokémon (June 5, 2014), Nintendo 3DS. An action game featuring characters from Pokémon the Movie: Diancie and the Cocoon of Destruction, and only released in Japan for a limited time through Nintendo eShop.
  • Pokémon Art Academy (June 19, 2014), Nintendo 3DS. A Pokémon-themed Art Academy game.
  • Pokkén Tournament (July 16, 2015), Arcade. A fighting game using gameplay elements from the Tekken series. Also released for Wii U on March 18, 2016 and for Nintendo Switch on September 22, 2017 with some enhancements, titled Pokkén Tournament DX. A limited edition Shadow MewTwo amiibo card is also released with the Wii U version of the game.
  • Great Detective Pikachu: Birth of a New Duo (February 3, 2016), Nintendo 3DS. A detective game, not being titled "Pokémon" it might be considered a series on its own.

A Nintendo DS tech demo starring Pikachu was also shown at E3 2004, but never released to the public.

Minor games

Many other games were released and these are:

LCD games

  • Pokémon Poké Ball (1999), LCD game by Tiger Electronics, shaped like a Poké Ball.
  • Pokémon Electronic Hand-Held Yahtzee (1999), LCD game by Hasbro.
  • Pokémon Cyclone 2 (2000), LCD game by Tiger Electronics, allowing both single player and two-player games.
  • Pokémon Cyber Pokédex (2006)
  • Pokémon Cyber SuperBall (2006), LCD game by Bandai shaped like a Poké Ball, coming in various variants. It can also be connected to the Cyber Pokédex.
  • Pokémon Digital Poké Ball D & P (2008), LCD game by Bandai shaped like a Poké Ball.

Many Pokédex toys were also released through the years by various companies.


PC games

  • Pokémon Play It! (1999), a game teaching how to play the Pokémon Trading Card Game. Only released in Europe and North America, included in the 2-Player CD-ROM Starter Set of the card game.
  • Pokémon Project Studio Red and Pokémon Project Studio Blue (November 9, 1999), drawing software featuring Generation I Pokémon and characters from the anime. It comes in two versions, each one with exclusive drawings.
  • Pokémon Play It! Version 2 (2000), sequel to the first Play It game. Only released in Europe and North America, included in the Thunderstorm Gift Box for the card game.
  • PokéROM (2000), a series of educational games only released in Japan.
  • Pokémon Masters Arena (January 1, 2004), a compilation of 8 minigames, only released in North America.
  • Pokémon Team Turbo (October 28, 2005), a racing game only released in North America.
  • Pokémon Team Rocket Blast Off, Pokémon Poké Ball Launcher, and Pokémon Seek & Find (2006), online. Three Flash-based games developed for the 10th Anniversary Perdue Farms promotion.
  • Pokémon PC Master (June 20, 2006), an educational game only released in North America.
  • Pokémon Trading Card Game Online (March 24, 2011), simulation of the Pokémon Trading Card Game, focusing on online play.


Arcade games

  • Dance! Pikachu (December 1999). A rhythm game.
  • Pikachu's Great Surfing Adventure (2000). A driving game.
  • Pokémon: Crayon Kids (July 2001). An art training game.
  • Pokémon: Wobbuffet Fell Down! (2006). A medal game.
  • Pokémon Battrio (July 14, 2007). Game focusing mainly on single battles in the vein of the Stadium games. It received four updates:
    • Pokémon Battrio +
    • Pokémon Battrio S
    • Pokémon Battrio 0
    • Pokémon Battrio V
  • Pokémon Get Round and Round (April 2010). A medal game.
  • Pokémon Tug of War Tournament: Absolutely Get Medal! (2010). A medal game.
  • Pokémon Medal World (January 17, 2012). A medal game.
  • Pokémon Tretta (July 14, 2012). A sequel to Battrio, it received four updates:
    • Pokémon Tretta Fes
    • The Pokémon Tretta
    • Pokémon Tretta Ultimate
    • Pokémon Tretta Ultimate Z
  • Pokémon: Battle Nine (July 8, 2014). A medal game.
  • Pokémon Card Game Gacha (2014). A Gashapon game.
  • Pokémon Ga-Olé (July 7, 2016). Sequel to Battrio and Tretta.


Sega Pico games (All these are educational games released on the Sega Pico console)

  • Pokémon: Catch the Numbers! (July 23, 2002), Sega Pico.
  • Pokémon Advanced Generation: I've Begun Hiragana and Katakana! (November 17, 2003), Sega Pico.
  • Pokémon Advanced Generation: Pico for Everyone - Pokémon Loud Battle! (July 16, 2004), Sega Pico.
  • Pokémon Advanced Generation: Pokémon Number Battle! (October 1, 2005), Advanced Pico Beena.
  • Intellectual Training Drill Pokémon Diamond & Pearl: Letter and Number Intelligence Game (April 21, 2007), Advanced Pico Beena.
  • Pokémon Diamond & Pearl: Search for Pokémon! Adventure in the Maze! (September 17, 2009), Advanced Pico Beena.
  • Pokémon Best Wishes: Intelligence Training Pokémon Big Sports Meet! (December 4, 2010), Advanced Pico Beena.


Mobile games

  • Pokémate (June 5, 2006), a virtual pet game.
  • Pokémon Say Tap? (July 15, 2011), a rhythm game.
  • Pokédex for iOS (December 6, 2012), a software based on Pokédex 3D Pro.
  • Pokémon TV (November 2010), a free video service providing select episode of the Pokémon anime.
  • Camp Pokémon (October 21, 2014), a collection of minigames.
  • Pokémon Style (February 15, 2015), a game for Android.
  • Pokémon Photo Booth (February 24, 2016) free software for iOS and Android, released to celebrate the series' 20th anniversary.
  • Pokémon Duel (April 12, 2016), strategy borad game for Android and iOS. Known in Japan as Pokémon Comaster.
  • Pokémon GO (July 6, 2016), a location-based game for iOS and Android.

Cinema & TV

An anime series was created to promote the games. It stars Ash Ketchum, a Pokémon trainer mostly based on the protagonist from Generation I games, and co-stars his Pikachu, who quickly became the mascot for the entire franchise. The tv series influenced the game series in some minor ways, and as a form of promotion some Pokémon from upcoming generations were also introduced before their debut in the games. The TV series is divided into six subseries loosely based on the various games, but unlike those it's written as a single continuous story.

Ash Ketchum

Ash Ketchum, the main character of the Pokémon anime.

The anime series and it's subseries are:
Note: here are counted all original Japanese episodes, though international releases excluded some of them.

  • Pokémon (April 1, 1997 - Ongoing), currently counting 972 episodes. Its subseries are:
    • Pokémon original series (April 1, 1997 - November 14, 2002), based on games from Generations I and II. It consists in 274 episodes, plus 2 episodes left out of the regular numbering due to scheduling problems and aired as specials instead, though they are considered regular episodes outside Japan.
    • Pokémon Advanced Generation (November 21, 2002 - September 14, 2006), based on games from Generation III. It counts 192 episodes, plus one that was produced and cancelled before airing.
    • Pokémon: Diamond and Pearl (September 28, 2006 - September 9, 2010), based on games from Generation IV. It counts 191 episodes.
    • Pokémon: Best Wishes (September 23, 2010 - September 26, 2013), based on games from Generation V and known as Pokémon: Black & White outside Japan. It counts 142 episodes plus two cancelled ones.
    • Pokémon XY (October 17, 2013 - November 10, 2016), based on games from Generation VI. It counts 140 episodes. Starting with episode 93 (October 29, 2015), the series changed title to Pokémon XY & Z.
    • Pokémon Sun & Moon (November 17, 2016 - ongoing), based on games from Generation VII, it currently counts 33 episodes.

Many additional episodes and specials aired occasionally as side cartoons, starring characters different than Ash, and sometimes based on games outside the core series. Many of these were released outside Japan as the additional series Pokémon Chronicles.

The series also received a series of 20 theatrical movies, released annually. They all take place in-continuity with the TV series and are:

  • Pokémon: The First Movie (July 18, 1998)
  • Pokémon: The Movie 2000 (July 17, 1999)
  • Pokémon 3: The Movie (July 8, 2000)
  • Pokémon 4ever (July 7, 2001)
  • Pokémon Heroes (July 13, 2002)
  • Pokémon - Jirachi: Wish Maker (July 19, 2003)
  • Pokémon - Destiny Deoxys (July 17, 2004)
  • Pokémon - Lucario and The Mystery of Mew (July 16, 2005)
  • Pokémon Ranger and The Temple Of the Sea (July 15, 2006)
  • Pokémon - The Rise of Darkrai (July 14, 2007)
  • Pokémon - Girantina and the sky warrior (July 19, 2008)
  • Pokémon - Arceus and The Jewel of Life (July 18, 2009)
  • Pokémon - Zoroark: Master of Illusions (July 10, 2010)
  • Pokémon the Movie: Black - Victini and Reshiram and Pokémon the Movie: White - Victini and Zekrom (July 16, 2011), two movies screened back-to-back in theaters, and collectively considered the fourteenth movie in the series.
  • Pokémon the Movie: Kyurem VS. The Sword of Justice (July 14, 2012)
  • Pokémon the Movie: Genesect and The Legend Awakened (July 13, 2013)
  • Pokémon the Movie: Diancie and the Cocoon of Desturction (July 19, 2014)
  • Pokémon the Movie: Hoopa and the Clash of Ages (July 18, 2015)
  • Pokémon the Movie: Volcanion and the Mechanical Magearna (July 16, 2016)
  • Pokémon the Movie 20: I choose you! (July 15, 2017)

Four TV specials also aired, sometimes considered movie entries in the series. These are:

  • Mewtwo Returns (December 30, 2000), a sequel to The First Movie.
  • The Legend of Thunder! (December 30, 2001)
  • The Mastermind of Mirage Pokémon (April 29, 2006)
  • Pokémon Origins (October 2, 2013), the only movie unrelated to the anime series, it's based on Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen and follows the games more closely than the anime.

Publications

Many manga based on the franchise were released, most of them self-contained. These include:

  • Pokémon: Pocket Monsters (1996 - 2003), simply known as Pocket Monsters in Japan, it's the first work derived from the games, predating the anime. Based on the Generation I and II games, it stars a Pokémon Trainer called Red and his Clefairy. It received five sequel series:
    • Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire (2003 - 2006), based on games from Generation III.
    • Pocket Monsters DP (2007 - 2009), based on games from Generation IV.
    • Pocket Monsters HGSS (2010 - 2011), based specifically on Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver.
    • Pocket Monsters BW (2011 - 2013), based on games from Generation V.
    • Pocket Monsters XY (2014 - 2016), based on games from Generation VI.
  • The Electric Tale of Pikachu (1997 - 2000), loosely based on select episode of the TV series.
  • Pokémon Gotta Catch 'Em All (1997 - 2001), an original story starring a Pokémon Trainer named Shu and his Pikachu.
  • Pokémon Adventures (1997 - Ongoing), titled Pocket Monsters Special in Japan, it's based on the various core games and currently counts 53 issues.
  • Pokémon Zensho (April 1998), based on Pokémon Red and Blue, it follows their plot more closely than most other adaptations in the series.
  • Mewtwo Strikes Back! (1998), based on The First Movie.
  • Pokémon Card GB The Comix (1998), based on the Game Boy game Pokémon Trading Card Game.
  • Magical Pokémon Journey (1998 - 2003), original story starring a Pikachu. It received a sequel series:
    • Pokémon Chamo-Chamo Pretty (2003 - 2006)
  • Mirage Pokémon Lugia's Explosive Birth (1999), based on The Movie 2000.
  • How I Became a Pokémon Card (1999 - 2001), a manga showing the stories behind some illustrations on Pokémon cards.
  • Emperor of the Crystal Tower: Entei (2000), based on Pokémon 3: The Movie.
  • Pokémon Gold & Silver: The Golden Boys (2000 - 2001), based on Pokémon Gold and Silver, it was cancelled prematurely.
  • Aim to Be a Card Master!! (December 2000), an original story starring a boy named Kenta, who wants to become a great player of the Pokémon Trading Card Game.
  • Celebi: a Timeless Encounter (2001), based on Pokémon 4Ever.
  • Ash and Pikachu (2001 - 2006), based on select episode of the TV series.
  • Guardian Gods of the City of Water: Latias and Latios (2002), based on the movie Pokémon Heroes.
  • Pokémon Colosseum Snatcher Leo (January - March 2003), based on Pokémon Colosseum.
  • Jirachi: Wish Maker (July 19, 2003), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Destiny Deoxys (2004), based on the movie Pokémon - Destiny Deoxys.
  • Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (2005), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pokémon XD: Whirlwind of Darkness (2005), manga serving as a walkthrough for the game Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.
  • Pokémon Battle: Pikachu's big exciting adventure (2005), an adaptation of the anime.
  • Pokémon Battle Frontier (2005 - 2007), based on games from Generation III.
  • Pokémon Ranger and the Temple of the Sea (2006), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pokémon Ranger -The 1st Mission- (April 2006), serving as a prelude to Pokémon Ranger.
  • Mobilize!! Pokémon Ranger (2006 - 2007), based on Pokémon Ranger.
  • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Ginji's Rescue Team (2006 - 2007), based on Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team and Blue Rescue Team.
  • The Rise of Darkrai (2007), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pokémon Diamond and Pearl Adventure! (2007 - 2009), series created by the same author as Pokémon Battle Frontier, based on games from Generation IV.
  • Pocket Monsters HGSS Jou's Big Adventure (2008), based on Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver.
  • Giratina and the Sky Warrior (2008), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Phantom Thief Pokémon 7 (March 28, 2008), original story starring a boy named Hioriwho leads a double life as the mysterious thief known as "Pokémon 7". It received a sequel manga:
    • Phantom Thief! Pokémon V (2012)
  • Pokémon Ranger Vatonage: The Road to Top Ranger (April - June 2008), based on Pokémon Ranger.
  • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blazing Exploration Team (August 28, 2008), based on Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness.
  • Pocket Monsters Diamond & Pearl (2008 - 2009), based on the Pokémon: Diamond and Pearl TV series.
  • Pokémon Quiz Puzzle Land Pikachu is a Famous Detective (2008 - 2009), an original story starring a detective Pikachu.
  • Arceus and the Jewel of Life (2009), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pocket Monsters Platinum: Aim to Be Battle King!! (2009), an original story starring a schoolboy named Yu, who competitively plays the Nintendo DS game Pokémon Platinum Version.
  • Pokémon Battrio: Aim to be Battrio Master! (2009 - 2010), based on the arcade game Pokémon Battrio.
  • Zoroark: Master of Illusions (2010), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pokémon Try Adventure (2010 - 2011), an original story starring a group of three Pokémon trainers.
  • White—Victini and Zekrom (2011), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Be the Best! Pokémon B+W (August 26, 2011), based on Pokémon Black and White.
  • Pocket Monsters BW: The Heroes of Fire and Thunder (October 28, 2011), based on Pokémon Black and White.
  • Pokémon RéBURST (2011 - 2012), an original story starring a boy named Ryouga, who has the ability to turn into a Pokémon-human hybrid by using a special technique called Burst.
  • Kyurem VS. The Sword of Justice (2012), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pokémon + Nobunaga's Ambition ~ Ranse's Color Picture Scroll ~ (2012), comic based on Pokémon Conquest and released online.
  • Pocket Monsters B2 W2 ~ A New Legend ~ (November 28, 2012), based on Pokémon Black 2 and White 2.
  • Genesect and the Legend Awakened (2013), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pocket Monsters BW: Good Partners (July 26, 2013), based on Pokémon Black and White.
  • Diancie and the Cocoon of Destruction (2014), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pokémon - The Legend of the Dragon King (March 25, 2014), an original story starring a Pokémon trainer named Akira and his Charizard.
  • Pokémon Omega Ruby Crimson Passion and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire Indigo Wisdom (January 23, 2015), two parallel mangas based respectively on Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire.
  • The Archdjinni of the Rings: Hoopa (July 18, 2015), based on the movie of the same name.
  • Pokemon Stories Together with Pikachu! (2015 - 2016), original stories starring a Pikachu.
  • Pocket Monsters Horizon (February 28, 2017), original story starring a trainer named Akira and his Rockruff.
  • Pocket Monsters the Movie: I Choose You! (May 2017), based on the movie of the same name.

Additionally some minor stories were published on Japanese manga magazines.

Also many books were released, including novels based on the anime, and manuuals providing extra informations on the games and their world.

Card and board games

A card game simply called Pokémon Trading Card Game was also created based on the game series and later, to some extent, on the anime series. The first series was released in 1996 and received new sets for each generation of games.

A series of collectable Pokémon figures was released in 2006 as a game called Pokémon Trading Figure Game. "Trainer cards" to use in the game were also released, based on cards from the trading card game.

Some board games were also released, including:

  • Pokémon Master Trainer (1999), a game based on Generation I games, and partly on the original TV series. It received an updated version:
    • Pokémon Master Trainer (2005), based on Generation III.
  • Pokémon Champion Island (2012), a DVD-board game.

Merchandise

Thousands of toys and promotional items were released through the years, including figurines, plush dolls and Pokémon-themed special editions of gaming consoles.

Sub series

Links to other series

Mascot link: Miis appear in My Pokémon Ranch, Pokémon Rumble Blast and Pokémon Rumble World.

Direction Series Date Description Type


3

Arrow L & R

Mario19960227 February 27, 1996Mario & Wario can be seen on a TV in Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue; In Pokémon Stadium 2, connecting video game consoles to a TV can show images from Mario games; Super Mario Maker features costumes based on Pokémons.2
3

Arrow L & R

Wario19960227 February 27, 1996Mario & Wario can be seen on a TV in Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue; a Pokémon Pikachu console is a treasure in Wario Land 3, while a Pokémon Mini console can be seen in WarioWare: Touched!2
5Arrow R Yoshi19971221 December 21, 1997Pikachu's name can be seen written on walls in Yoshi's Story.2
5Arrow R Dragon Quest19980925 September 25, 1998The Dragon Quest Monsters series features some similarities to the Pokémon series; the Wooper Trooper enemy in Dragon Quest IX is believed by some to be based on the Pokémon Wooper.3
4Arrow L Monster in My Pocket19980928 September 28, 1998The Pocket Monsters series' name was changed to "Pokémon" outside Japan to avoid issues with the Monster in My Pocket series.3
6

Dash

Superman1999 1999Team Rocket has a battle with Superman in a Kids' WB promo.1
6

Dash

Batman1999 1999Ash Ketchum meets Batman from Batman Beyond in a Kids' WB promo.1
6

Dash

Men in Black1999 1999Bulbasaur becomes Agent K's new partner in a Kids' WB promo for Men in Black.1
6

Dash

Pinky and the Brain1999 1999Ash Ketchum meets Pinky and the Brain and the Brain loses against Ash's Charmeleon in a battle.1
5Arrow R Super Smash Bros.19990121 January 21, 1999Characters, places and items from the Pokémon series are featured in all Super Smash Bros. games.1
5Arrow R Harvest Moon19990205 February 05, 1999Kai and Ken's baby wears Pikachu pajamas at the age of one month.3
5Arrow R The Simpsons19990516 May 16, 1999The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo" and many later episodes as well as The Simpsons Game, feature references to Pokémon.3
5Arrow R The Norm Show19991006 October 06, 1999The Norm Show episode "Artie Comes to Town" features a scene referencing Pokémon.2
5Arrow R South Park19991103 November 03, 1999The South Park episode "Chinpokomon" feature a TV show parodying Pokémon.2.5
4Arrow L Panel de Pon20000921 September 21, 2000Pokémon Puzzle Challenge and Pokémon Puzzle League feature the same gameplay as Panel de Pon, with the same panels also appearing in Puzzle Challenge.1
3

Arrow L & R

Donkey Kong20001214 December 14, 2000In Pokémon Stadium 2, connecting an NES to a TV can show an image from Donkey Kong; music themes from the Pokémon series are featured in Donkey Konga games.2
4Arrow L Zelda20001214 December 14, 2000In Pokémon Stadium 2, connecting video game consoles to a TV can show images from Zelda games.2
4Arrow L Kirby20001214 December 14, 2000In Pokémon Stadium 2, connecting video game consoles to a TV can show images from Kirby's Adventure and 'Kirby Super Star; Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum feature a reference to Kirby.2
4Arrow L Star Fox20001214 December 14, 2000In Pokémon Stadium 2, connecting video game consoles to a TV can show an image from Star Fox 64.2
4Arrow L F-Zero20001214 December 14, 2000In Pokémon Stadium 2, connecting the SNES to a TV can show an image from F-Zero.2
5Arrow R Conker20010305 March 05, 2001In Conker's Bad Fur Day there was going to be a joke about Pikachu's Expense however the Nintendo asked to remove it and all that's left in the code is a model of Pikachu's Tail.51
5Arrow R Segagaga20010329 March 29, 2001A parody of Pokémon called "Tsukemono Monsters" is featured within Segagaga.2.5
5Arrow R Animal Crossing20010414 April 14, 2001The Pokémon Pikachu console makes an appearance in Animal Forest and its sequels; one of the designs in the Animal Crossing e-Reader cards is based on the Pokéball.2
5Arrow R Osmosis Jones20010807 August 07, 2001A germ holding a Pikachu appears in the movie, Osmosis Jones.1
5Arrow R ReBoot200111 November 2001The TV special ReBoot: My Two Bobs features references to Pokémon.3
5Arrow R Arthur (PBS)20011126 November 26, 2001Muffy says that she has fifty-four Dopeyman cards in a pack, in resemblance to Pokémon cards, and with one card a take on a Pikachu called "Stinkachu".3
5Arrow R Malcolm in the Middle20020203 February 03, 2002Pokémon cards appear in a scene in the Malcolm in the Middle episode "Company Picnic".2
6

Dash

Tetris20020321 March 21, 2002Pokemon Shock Tetris is a part of both series.1
5Arrow R The Elder Scrolls20020531 May 31, 2002There is a cave called Marowak's Spine named after the pokemon, Marowak.3
5Arrow R Fillmore!20020921 September 21, 2002The Fillmore! episode "Test of the Tested" features a reference to Pokémon.2
5Arrow R Pikmin20021121 November 21, 2002The Pokémon Nuzeleaf might be based on the red Pikmin.3
5Arrow R Taiko no Tatsujin20031218 December 18, 2003Taiko no Tatsujin: Waku Waku anime Matsuri, Taiko no Tatsujin 6, 9 to 2011, DS, DS3, all five Wii games, 3DS, Wii U and Plus feature music tracks from the Pokémon series.2
4Arrow L Blue's Clues20040101 January 01, 2004The code of Pokémon Masters Arena features leftover graphics and music from Blue Takes You to School.53
4Arrow L Care Bears20040101 January 01, 2004The code of Pokémon Masters Arena features leftover graphics and music from Care Bears: Let's Have a Ball!.53
4Arrow L VeggieTales20040101 January 01, 2004The code of Pokémon Masters Arena features leftover graphics and music from VeggieTales Jonah: Kahlil & The Camels.53
5Arrow R Codename: Kids Next Door20040723 July 23, 2004In the episode A.R.C.H.I.V.E. there is a kid who has the same looks as Ash Ketchum.3
5Arrow R Drawn Together20041027 October 27, 2004Ling-Ling, one of the main characters in Drawn Together, is a parody of Pikachu, and there also are other references to the Pokémon series in some episodes.3
5Arrow R Robot Chicken20050220 February 20, 2005Many Robot Chicken episodes feature clips based on Pokémon.2
5Arrow R Asterix20051016 October 16, 2005In Asterix & Obelix XXL 2: Mission: Las Vegum there is a possible psyduck spinning wheel.3
5Arrow R Smosh20051128 November 28, 2005Smosh sings The Pokemon Theme Song.2
5Arrow R Lucky Star2007429 April 29, 2007Konata knows how to recite all entries of the Pokédex, Kagami uses Ash's catch phrase "Getto-Daze", Gotta Catch'em All3
5Arrow R Johnny Test20071013 October 13, 2007The Johnny Test episodes "Johnny'mon" and "Return of Johnny'mon" feature references to Pokémon.3
5Arrow R Ratchet & Clank20071023 October 23, 2007In Ratchet & Clank: Tools of Destruction, a skill point under the name "Gotta Catch 'Em All" is a possible reference to Pokémon.3
5Arrow R Nostalgia Critic20080420 April 20, 2008The Nostalgia Critic reviews "Pokémon: The Movie".2
4Arrow L Cardcaptor Sakura20080508 May 08, 2008Near the beginning of the Pokémon: Diamond and Pearl episode "Staging a Heroes' Welcome!" there are two girls looking like Sakura and Tomoyo from Cardcaptor Sakura.3
5Arrow R My Name is Earl20081211 December 11, 2008In the episode "Reading is a Fundamental Case" there is a Blastoise plush sitting on top of some books.2


4Arrow L Doctor Who20090322 March 22, 2009In Pokémon Platinum, a character named Looker resembles the tenth doctor from Doctor Who.3
5Arrow R Haruhi Suzumiya20090807 August 07, 2009Two Pikachu masks, a purple Turtwig mask, a yellow Chimchar mask, and an orange Piplup mask can be seen on display.3
5Arrow R Family Guy20100411 April 11, 2010A poster depicting a superhero that strongly resembles a Machoke can be seen in Chris's room.3
5Arrow R Super Meat Boy20101020 October 20, 2010The World 6 intro in Super Meat Boy is a parody of the intro from Pokémon Red/Blue.3
5Arrow R Monster Galaxy201011 November 2010There are several references to Pokémon in Monster Galaxy.3
5Arrow R Poker Night at the Inventory20101122 November 22, 2010Poker Night at the Inventory features a reference to Pokémon.2
5Arrow R The Cleveland Show2011019 January 9, 2011While Cleveland and Rallo visit the County Fair, one of the stands has plushies resembling Gengar.3
5Arrow R Hyperdimension Neptunia20110818 August 18, 2011Hyperdimension Neptunia Mk2 features a character called Pirachu, that is a parody of Pikachu and there also are other references to Pokémon.3
5Arrow R Atop the 4th Wall20111031 October 31, 2011Linkara reviews Pokemon: The Electric Tale of Pikachu (HD).2
5Arrow R House20111128 November 28, 2011In the episode "Perils of Paranoia", Dr. House references the Pokémon Arceus and the Poison status effect.2
5Arrow R Good Vibes20111208 December 08, 2011The Good Vibes episode "The Grass is Always Greener" features a reference to Pokémon.2
5Arrow R Final Fantasy20111215 December 15, 2011Final Fantasy XIII-2 features a reference to the Pokémon series.3
6

Dash

Nobunaga's Ambition20120319 March 19, 2012Pokémon Conquest is a crossover between Pokémon and Nobunaga's Ambition.1
4Arrow L Warriors (Koei)20120319 March 19, 2012Pokémon Conquest features some character's design based on Samurai Warriors 3.3
5Arrow R Haiyore! Nyaruko-san20120409 April 09, 2012The Haiyore! Nyaruko-san episodes "Like a Close Encounter of the Third Kind" and "Conspiracy of the Big X" feature a reference to Pokémon.3
5Arrow R Community20120517 May 17, 2012The Community episode "Digital Estate Planning" features references to Pokémon.3
5Arrow R Video Game High School20120531 May 31, 2012The Video Game High School episode "Any Game in the House" features a reference to Pokémon. The game Pokermon from the series is also based on Pokémon.2
5Arrow R Are We There Yet?20120919 September 19, 2012The Are We There Yet? episode "The Bad Dream Episode" features a reference to Pokémon.2
5Arrow R 30 Rock20121018 October 18, 2012The 30 Rock episode "Stride of Pride" features many references to Pokémon.2
5Arrow R Scribblenauts20121113 November 13, 2012Scribblenauts Unlimited features the fan-made Pokémon "Tentaquil".3
5Arrow R The Big Bang Theory20130131 January 31, 2013The Big Bang Theory episodes "The Cooper/Kripke Inversion" and "The Indecision Amalgamation" feature references to Pokémon.2
5Arrow R HarmoKnight20130328 March 28, 2013HarmoKnight features balloons with Pokémon references.3
5Arrow R Mii Plaza201310 October 2013Mii Plaza includes a Puzzle Swap puzzle based on Pokémon X and Pokémon Y.2
5Arrow R American Dad!20131103 November 03, 2013Steve plays with Pokémon Trading Cards in Buck, Wild.2
5Arrow R Steven Universe2014049 April 9, 2014A toy resembling Pikachu appears in the Steven Universe episode "Steven the Sword Fighter". The videogame "Mini Golf Quest" from the Steven Universe episode "Rose's Room" is partly inspired by Pokémon3
5Arrow R Ben 1020140412 April 12, 2014Max Tennyson and Sheriff Wat-Senn are fishing and catch two fish that look like Magikarp and Gyarados in the "Ben 10: Omniverse" episode "Rook Tales".3
6

Dash

Art Academy20140619 June 19, 2014Pokémon Art Academy is a crossover between the two series.1
5Arrow R Teen Titans20140619 June 19, 2014The Teen Titans Go! episode "Man Person" features a reference to Pokémon.3
5Arrow R Adventure Time20140814 August 14, 2014In the episode Joshua and Margaret Investigations, a Poké Ball can be seen in Margaret's weapon room.3
5Arrow R Ben 1020141021 October 21, 2014The Ben 10: Omniverse episode "Rook Tales" features two fishes looking like Pokémon Magikarp and Gyarados.3
5Arrow R Nintendo Badge Arcade20141217 December 17, 2014Nintendo Badge Arcade features badges based on the Pokémon series.2
5Arrow R Yo-Kai Watch2015515 May 15, 2015When Gnomey reads a book about the information about ghosts while hiding from Whisper, Jibanyan, and Hidabat, thinking they were monsters, the picture on a page he's reading resembles three ghosts that resembles the bodies of Gastly, Haunter, and Gengar.3
6

Dash

Tekken20150716 July 16, 2015Pokkén Tournament is a format crossover featuring characters from Pokémon and gameplay elements from Tekken.3
5Arrow R Himouto! Umaru-chan20150807 August 07, 2015Animé's opening shows Doma's residence in Pokémon graphics. The three circles on the kotatsu recall the starters3
6

Dash

Picross20151202 December 02, 2015Pokémon Picross is a crossover between the two series; additionally Picross NP Vol. 1 includes images from the Pokémon series.1
5Arrow R Splatoon2016219 February 19, 2016There's a Splatfest between Pokémon Red and Blue.2
5Arrow R Son of Zorn2016102 October 2, 2016Pokémon' was mentioned in the Son of Zorn episode "War of the Workplace".2

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